Patterson’s love story

Youth is that inexplicable moment in our lives, when fiction seems more like a better versed reality. Our imagination keeps us company, and shields us from the harm that is inescapably woven into our lives. We see a brighter life than what we do as adults, because as a child our life is more simple. More prone to see the beautiful and the good in our atmosphere and the people we deal with. More prone to believing in people, even if they don’t exactly exist. It’s against fiction law to remember your imaginary friend(s), but Jane, the main character of James Patterson’s newest book, “Sunday’s at Tiffany’s,” never was good with laws, for she did not only remember him, but feel in love with him as well.

By Stephanie Wytovich,

Staff Writer

Youth is that inexplicable moment in our lives, when fiction seems more like a better versed reality. Our imagination keeps us company, and shields us from the harm that is inescapably woven into our lives. We see a brighter life than what we do as adults, because as a child our life is more simple. More prone to see the beautiful and the good in our atmosphere and the people we deal with. More prone to believing in people, even if they don’t exactly exist. It’s against fiction law to remember your imaginary friend(s), but Jane, the main character of James Patterson’s newest book, “Sunday’s at Tiffany’s,” never was good with laws, for she did not only remember him, but feel in love with him as well.

Patterson is not an author you tend to think of when you hear about a heart wrenching love story that will have you captivated for hours. For instance, you may be more inclined to think of Jodi Picoult, or Nicholas Sparks. But just as all of his stories are filled with trickery, the man never ceases to surprise me. Sunday’s at Tiffany’s is honestly one of the best written love stories that I have read. So enticing in fact, that I finished in three hours flat.

Consumed in a world where fiction clashes with reality, and no rules apply, Jane grew up with her imaginary friend Michael. He protected her from an obsessive, high rolling, workaholic of a mother, and walked her to school every morning so she wouldn’t be alone.

And every Sunday before she would go to Tiffany’s with her mother, they would share their routine dish of ice cream at the St. Regis Hotel in New York City. Terror struck both of their lives when Jane turned nine, and Michael had to break her heart and tell her that he was leaving on her birthday. But she wouldn’t be sad, because she wouldn’t remember anything about him. It was the only way Michael could deal with the pain of losing the one he loved so much.

The years passed, and Jane never forgot. She could remember him as vividly as if he were still there sitting and conversing beside her. Her life was the same; still filled with people disappointing and hurting her. But coming home one day from work, unable to escape her mother’s torture even there, she caught a familiar face out of the corner of her eye. Michael? Could it really be him, plain as day? Was she getting one last shot to rekindle the love of a long lost friend?

Patterson’s story is both one of love and pain. It’s a story that will touch your heart in a way that none of his stories have before. Open your eyes to the world that you’re not supposed to see, and definitely not remember. Break the law, and fall in love with your imaginary friend all over again.