Off-Campus housing could affect On-Campus living

The Greensburg city council approved an ordinance that dealt with an attempt to govern student housing. The anticipated restrictions consist of a requirement that homes occupied by college students be 500 feet apart.

By Megan Seigh

Staff Writer

The Greensburg city council approved an ordinance that dealt with an attempt to govern student housing. The anticipated restrictions consist of a requirement that homes occupied by college students be 500 feet apart.

The 500-foot regulation is relevant throughout the borough of Greensburg, including the area outside the city’s downtown area. One change would include a landlord using more than one unit on a property for students to live in, but the total number of students on that land can’t surpass five.

Robin Anke, dean of residence life, offered Seton Hill University’s (SHU) official statement:
“Seton Hill University encourages students to live on campus… At this time, given the University’s work to repurpose and convert space for student living on campus and the challenging economic climate, Seton Hill does not anticipate a housing crunch on campus for the fall 2009 semester. A third, new residence hall is part of Seton Hill’s strategic and master plan discussions and could house as many as 200 additional students.”

The thought of adding another residence hall was on the mind of many students last fall, especially those who did not get on the list for a room in any of SHU’s seven buildings.
With the new law intact concerning off-campus housing, the campus needs to make sure it can hold those students who will not be able to live in the city of Greensburg.

“I think that the people in Greensburg just don’t want the city to change,” said Stephanie Gerber, a senior.

“I am not familiar with the ruling but right now I live in southwest Greensburg so I don’t know if they are exempt from this; but all of the suburbs of Greensburg are pretty close, so if students can still live there it won’t be bad,” said Gerber.

Mary Clark, a senior, said, “I am confident that the University will take the proper steps in either reaching a compromise with the city or create alternative housing options to meet the needs of its current and potential students.”

Clark refers to alternative housing situations, which had to happen this past fall when students lived in Greensburg’s Marriott because those students could not get on-campus housing. However, as guaranteed by the University, all students possessed some kind of housing.

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