Harlan Gallery’s Hand/Print exhibition

Hand/Print is an exhibition of artwork featuring aspects of the printmaking process, such as monotype, etching, screenprinting, collograph and mixed media.

By Megan Seigh

Staff Writer

Hand/Print is an exhibition of artwork featuring aspects of the printmaking process, such as monotype, etching, screenprinting, collograph, and mixed media.

The Harlan Gallery offers a variety of wonderful and changing exhibitions year round. A lot of the gallery’s art exhibitions are done primarily by students, but not this exhibit.

“One aspect to remember is that this is not a student exhibit; all of the artists are from the region,” says Carol Brode, Director of the Harlan Gallery.

The outer region artists have submitted works that really challenge viewers’ imaginations. People can be sure they will not find any two pieces that are similar.

These paintings and sculptures have never been more colorful or creative.
Pati Beachley, Associate Professor of Sculpture, was pleased with the outcome of the exhibit. However, for the time being her students are involved in the development of the Question Marker Project, supported by both the National Catholic Center for Holocaust Education (NCCHE) and the Seton Hill University (SHU) Art Program.

Beachley said, “My student’s lean more toward sculpture, so the markers will be very detailed all of the way around.”

Some of the artists who participated in the Hand/Print exhibit used their sculpture skill to create detailed human body figurines.

Artists submitted work for screening by the art faculty; the works accepted are on display. There were three award winners: one for best of show and two honorable mentions.

There were two sculptures done by Eileen Yeager, called “I AM MAN” and “I AM WOMAN” that portrayed the three-dimensional effect that was described by Beachley.
Some of the other artists included Jim Rettinger, who designed a very intricate “Hands On” and Terri Perpich, who designed “Ruby,” “The Duel,” and “Two Women” which seemed to be an adaptation of a young woman and an older woman.

The first place prize went to Kathryn Strutz who created the vibrant “Hen House Hysteria.”