Holocaust exhibit shows promise

On Thurs. April 22, 2010 here at Seton Hill University (SHU) the first phase of the Holocaust Center exhibits took place. The event was held in the Administration Building (ADMIN) in room 312.

By Tyler Carter

Contributor

On Thurs. April 22, 2010 here at Seton Hill University (SHU) the first phase of the Holocaust Center exhibits took place. The event was held in the Administration Building (ADMIN) in room 312.

Volunteers and faculty put together the exhibit and turned the office space in room 312 into a makeshift museum. Wilda Kaylor, director of the Holocaust Center said, “This is the first phase and we are really excited for the next phase.” The second phase will show more permanence and offer more resources and information.

The staff showed great enthusiasm and gave excellent information concerning the exhibits and portraits. The most interesting exhibits were the typewriters, which were created by art students here at SHU. Each typewriter was masterfully crafted and had a theme related to hope or love during the Nazi rule. The intricacy and detail of the typewriters cannot be fully appreciated until you go to the exhibit and see them yourself.

The exhibits and portraits gave a first-hand look at the life of a prisoner held in the Nazi camps. Erica Mudge, a SHU alumna, created the dresser. The dresser was crafted to show the life of a Jewish family on the run. The events art was a reminder of the current day issues of genocide in Darfur and the deplorable conditions in Haiti. One of the staff workers, Tom Adams, a senior said, “It was really interesting to see how the art students got their message across in the exhibits.” The messages found within each of the typewriters and the dresser had a definite stance against genocide.

Events like this always have a greater meaning that initially realized and offered to those who attended a great appreciation for freedom and democracy. Hannah Leonard, a senior volunteer at the Holocaust Center said, “The event gave me more of an outlook on things that happen on our campus.” The Holocaust Center is at its early stages, but it did not lack impact or significance.

The exhibits subtly brought out elements of a life that most of us cannot even imagine.

The Holocaust Center will bring information and resources for Holocaust studies and awareness of related social issues. Kaylor said, “The next phase will be much larger and it will be in a more permanent location.” She was eager to answer questions and was excited to get this project underway. Kaylor also said. “If students would like to get involved, just come to the third floor of Admin, room 312.”