Drawing with words: A recap of Random Acts of Poetry Day

Colorful chalk poetry and artworks crowded the sidewalk outside Reeves Library. Photo courtesy of E.Vissat.

Colorful chalk poetry and artworks crowded the sidewalk outside Reeves Library. Photo courtesy of E.Vissat.

If people found themselves walking up to the library on Oct. 5, they would stumble upon something quite out of the ordinary. Various poems containing flowing verses and illuminating phrases were found scattered across the pavement. Members from the Seton Hill English Club established this day as “Random Acts of Poetry Day.” I found myself walking towards the library to find a number of the club members writing down poems with chalk of various colors. The pieces of poetry were myriad in their content, structure and creation. These works of rhyme and rhythm were ranging from the classic writings of Emily Dickinson, to more contemporary works by Rupi Kaur and to rather surreal creations of E. E. Cummings. While my experience witnessing some of Seton Hill’s students make their poetic mark upon campus was very fascinating, I also found it extremely thought-provoking.

In the age of recycled radio hits and sugar-coated pop stars, it can be quite easy to lose touch with the true poetic side of the literary world. Sometimes we need to reflect on what poetry means to us as individuals as well as a general whole. Poetry is more than taking a few lines and making them sound pretty with descriptions and rhymes. To write a poem is to paint a picture without even picking up a paintbrush or shading in a single space. Words and phrases are woven together in such a way that the reader’s mind is captivated by a mixture of emotions and images. It is times like “Random Acts of Poetry Day” that remind us that poetry is one of the primary sources and summits of human expression. We have all been moved by a song or a poem at some point in our lives and it is because to write a poem is to paint an image using only your words, allowing the whole world to see through your own eyes. “Random Acts of Poetry Day” should not be limited to one singular time of poetic expression, rather it should be made into a stepping stone into a continuous period of creativity.

With this being said, the staff of The Setonian invite you to allow us and other fellow SHU students to see the world through your eyes. We encourage you to submit any and all works of poetry to us so that the creative body of Seton Hill may continue to flourish. Come be a part of this expressive body by submitting your works to The Setonian’s email: setonian@gmail.com

Motivational quotes, personal poems and well known poetry decorated SHU campus. Photo courtesy of E.Vissat.

Motivational quotes, personal poems and well known poetry decorated SHU campus. Photo courtesy of E.Vissat.

Students wrote their own poetry on the sidewalk. Photo courtesy of E.Vissat.

Students wrote their own poetry on the sidewalk. Photo courtesy of E.Vissat.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *